EEOC Settles Religious Discrimination Lawsuit

According to the EEOC, Contractor Fired Seventh-day Adventist Because of His Sabbath Request

A North Carolina concrete company will pay $42,500 to settle a religious discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).  The EEOC alleged that a contractor refused to accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs and fired him because of his religion.  Employee is a Seventh-day Adventist.

The employee’s Seventh-day Adventist faith requires him to observe the Sabbath and refrain from working on Saturdays.  According to EEOC’s complaint, when the employee refused to work a requested Saturday because of his religious beliefs, the company failed to accommodate him and then fired him.

Such conduct violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which requires employers to make reasonable accommodations to sincerely held religious beliefs of employees absent undue hardship.

In Missouri, the Missouri Human Rights Act also protects employees from discrimination based on religion.

An attorney for the EEOC’s Charlotte District Office stated: “[the] EEOC hopes that this case serves as a reminder to employers that unless providing a reasonable accommodation would impose an undue hardship on the company, the accommodation must be provided. No one should ever be forced to choose between his religion and his job.”

The EEOC is a federal agency that attempts to enforce federal laws.  The state agency that investigates claims of religious discrimination in places like Kansas City is the Missouri Commission on Human Rights (MCHR).  Kansas City workers can file a charge of discrimination with either the EEOC or the MCHR.

If your employer has refused to accommodate your religious beliefs you may want to speak with a labor lawyer or an attorney who has experience with discrimination lawsuits.

Labor Lawyer

If your employer has fired you because of your religious beliefs you may want to speak with a labor lawyer or an attorney who has experience with discrimination lawsuits.

Attorney for Workers

Before filing an EEOC charge of discrimination, you may want to contact a law firm with experience drafting EEOC complaints.  An attorney with experience drafting discrimination charges may be able to help you preserve your rights.

Discrimination lawsuits often have short deadlines so you should consider contacting an attorney right away.

Attorney for Workers

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